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T.O. Environs
Whitby
1450 Henry Street, Whitby ON L1N 0A8 (corner of Henry and Victoria Streets)
hours: Mon-Wed & Fri 10-4:30, Thur 10-9, Sat & Sun 12-4. Closed Good Friday, Easter Sunday & Monday, Victoria Day, Canada Day, August Civic Holiday, Labour Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day, Boxing Day, New Year's Eve & Day.
admission: FREE
T: 905 668 4185
Google™ Map
art@stationgallery.ca
www.stationgallery.ca
Station Gallery
Exhibitions ... more
Exhibitions
Sep 9-Oct 8, 2017 | opening reception Thur 14 Sep, 7pm:
Frances Ferdinands: Between Latitudes. Frances Ferdinands is a Sri Lankan-born Canadian visual artist whose exhibition history spans three decades. Her work is usually constructed in thematically based series, and has always been concerned with social, cultural and political issues. Since 2007 her work has gravitated towards Sri Lankan references, and stories related to her own biography, including migration, references to her hybrid identity and childhood memories of trying to “fit in.” Much of the work for this solo exhibition emanates from revisiting her homeland of Sri Lanka. There she studied with masters in the field of traditional Sri Lankan fine art and craft that is not widely practised anymore in the country. She states: “My intention was to study these old forms and revitalize them through re-interpretation within a contemporary context.”
In the Jill Dyall Community Gallery | Bernard Leroux: Reclaiming The Bois-Brûlés ... more
Frances Ferdinands: Between Latitudes.
Frances Ferdinands is a Sri Lankan-born Canadian visual artist whose exhibition history spans three decades. Her work is usually constructed in thematically based series, and has always been concerned with social, cultural and political issues. Since 2007 her work has gravitated towards Sri Lankan references, and stories related to her own biography, including migration, references to her hybrid identity and childhood memories of trying to “fit in.”
Much of the work for this solo exhibition emanates from revisiting her homeland of Sri Lanka. There she studied with masters in the field of traditional Sri Lankan fine art and craft that is not widely practised anymore in the country. She states: “My intention was to study these old forms and revitalize them through re-interpretation within a contemporary context.”

In the Jill Dyall Community Gallery | Bernard Leroux: Reclaiming The Bois-Brûlés.
Oct 14-Dec 10, 2017 | reception Fri 20 Oct, 7pm:
Ingrid Ruthig: RE|Visions.
The solo exhibition, Ingrid Ruthig: Re|Visions, builds on a series of 120 portrait-and-biography diptychs of women creators selected from throughout history. Ingrid Ruthig's body of work questions perceptions and the accepted version of our creative legacy, by examining the skewed nature of biography, the portrait, literary and art history, as well as an artist's sense of herself as creator.
Working with a combination of text and image from a wide range of sources, Ruthig references representations. "I'm fascinated by our collective determination to build, reshape or restore from fragments a narrative about the world and ourselves in it, and how we imagine the incomplete story with the unknowable end." Ruthig continues: "But that story is never entirely a reliable one." Through manipulation and layering, weaving and stitchery, her work scrambles perception and shifts the view to offer a re/vision of the individuals presented, in order to spur questions, to reveal the flaws and inadequacies of a man-made history, to re-see – rather than blindly accept as accurate – our text and image inheritance.
2016 was the Canadian centennial of women's suffrage, and 2017 is Canada's 150th anniversary. Here's a prime opportunity to reflect on the women who, through their art, helped shape our views in this province, this country and the world ... more
Ingrid Ruthig: RE|Visions.
The solo exhibition, Ingrid Ruthig: Re|Visions, builds on a series of 120 portrait-and-biography diptychs of women creators selected from throughout history. Ingrid Ruthig's body of work questions perceptions and the accepted version of our creative legacy, by examining the skewed nature of biography, the portrait, literary and art history, as well as an artist's sense of herself as creator.
Working with a combination of text and image from a wide range of sources, Ruthig references representations. "I'm fascinated by our collective determination to build, reshape or restore from fragments a narrative about the world and ourselves in it, and how we imagine the incomplete story with the unknowable end." Ruthig continues: "But that story is never entirely a reliable one." Through manipulation and layering, weaving and stitchery, her work scrambles perception and shifts the view to offer a re/vision of the individuals presented, in order to spur questions, to reveal the flaws and inadequacies of a man-made history, to re-see – rather than blindly accept as accurate – our text and image inheritance.
2016 was the Canadian centennial of women's suffrage, and 2017 is Canada's 150th anniversary. Here's a prime opportunity to reflect on the women who, through their art, helped shape our views in this province, this country and the world.
Oct 14-Dec 10, 2017 | reception Fri 20 Oct, 7pm:
Florence H. McGillivray: Finding Florence.
Back in 1970, Station Gallery opened its doors with an inaugural exhibition of Whitby's most famed historical artist. This posthumous retrospective of Florence Helena McGillivray brought exposure to a little-known and under-appreciated figure in the development of early Canadian art.
She was born on March 1, 1864 on a farm at the corner of Taunton and Lakeridge Roads. In the early 1900s she taught at what is now Trafalgar Castle School. McGillivray travelled to France in 1913 to further her art studies. Freely absorbing modern movements in Europe, she imported her influences upon returning to Canada.
She actively exhibited and pursued a career as an artist. She retired to live in Toronto in the 1930s, where she died in 1938. Her paintings are represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Gallery of Hamilton and The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa. Many believe that she taught Tom Thomson a trick or two about painting.
During the sesquicentennial autumn, we'll revisit and retrace McGillivray's eclectic stylistic paths. Borrowing from both public holdings and private collections, Finding Florence adds presence and dimension to an artist who is only now rightfully attaining her esteemed place in Canadian art ... more
Florence H. McGillivray: Finding Florence.
Back in 1970, Station Gallery opened its doors with an inaugural exhibition of Whitby's most famed historical artist. This posthumous retrospective of Florence Helena McGillivray brought exposure to a little-known and under-appreciated figure in the development of early Canadian art.
She was born on March 1, 1864 on a farm at the corner of Taunton and Lakeridge Roads. In the early 1900s she taught at what is now Trafalgar Castle School. McGillivray travelled to France in 1913 to further her art studies. Freely absorbing modern movements in Europe, she imported her influences upon returning to Canada.
She actively exhibited and pursued a career as an artist. She retired to live in Toronto in the 1930s, where she died in 1938. Her paintings are represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, Art Gallery of Hamilton and The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa. Many believe that she taught Tom Thomson a trick or two about painting.
During the sesquicentennial autumn, we'll revisit and retrace McGillivray's eclectic stylistic paths. Borrowing from both public holdings and private collections, Finding Florence adds presence and dimension to an artist who is only now rightfully attaining her esteemed place in Canadian art.
Events ... more
Events
Oct / Nov 2017:
Art Talks. (16+ years; $5 suggested donation) –
Thur 28 Sep, 7-8pm: "Collage Auto Portrait." Twenty years ago, Anishinaabe artist Robert Houle created a remarkable suite of twelve mixed media self-portraits. This landmark series is preserved in the SG permanent collection. Join the artist for this special artist talk on the final Thursday of September.
Mon 2 Oct, 1-2pm: "Indefinite: Art & Disability." This premiere art talk surveys the visual arts' encounter with disability. How has this theme or condition been historically pictured? Who has changed how we appreciate disability and Deaf Arts? ... more
Art Talks. (16+ years; $5 suggested donation) –
Thur 28 Sep, 7-8pm: "Collage Auto Portrait." Twenty years ago, Anishinaabe artist Robert Houle created a remarkable suite of twelve mixed media self-portraits. This landmark series is preserved in the SG permanent collection. Join the artist for this special artist talk on the final Thursday of September.
Mon 2 Oct, 1-2pm: "Indefinite: Art & Disability." This premiere art talk surveys the visual arts' encounter with disability. How has this theme or condition been historically pictured? Who has changed how we appreciate disability and Deaf Arts?
Thur 19 Oct, 7-8pm: "Overlooked: Canadian Art in The Shining." Stanley Kubrick's 1980 horror classic The Shining is a covert foray into Canadian art history. Dozens of familiar and not-so-familiar paintings have been spotted on the set of the haunted alpine hotel. Just in time for Hallowe'en, SG Curator Olex reveals his independent research into Canadian artistic content hidden in-plain-sight in Kubrick's cinematic masterpiece.
Mon 6 Nov, 1-2pm: "You Can Call Me Al." "And Betty when you call me, you can call me Al." Taking our cue from Paul Simon's 1986 hit single, we'll take an arbitrary and whimsical stroll through the art world looking for artists given names that begin with Al. There are many artists to choose from, including Allen, Alexander, Albrecht – drop in and see how far this list goes....
Thur 16 Nov, 7-8pm: "Remember When – A Nostalgic Trip Back to the 50s and 60s with Tim Westhead." In this encore presentation we take a Baby Boomer's trip back to the simpler times of the 50s and 60s. Enjoy "remember when" trivia games, fill in missing song lyrics, and chuckle at hairstyles and yesteryear's fast foods. And bring along a Boomer buddy to double your fun during this dynamic, interactive, and entertaining presentation, daddio!" Guest lecturer Tim Westhead welcomes participants to bring one or more non-perishable food items to donate to the Deacon's Cupboard.
(See also Community Courses – click here) ... more
(See also Community Courses – click here).